Ep 6. Part 2: Was my husband gay? (with Aleenah)

This episode is the final part of two episodes that explores an asexual marriage.  We hear a brutally honest account of Aleena’s short-lived marriage.

Listen to episode 5 for part 1.

 

WARNING: this is an explicit episode with adult themes and language. Please put your earphones on and listen to this in private.

 

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed on these podcasts are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Not Another Mum Pod’s management or of any sponsors. Any content provided by our contributors are of their opinion and are not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, identity (gender or sexual) club, organization, company, individual or anyone or anything.

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The intention behind this candid conversation is to bring to light the serious issues that can happen in a marriage, that nobody openly talks about. We hear a brutally honest account of Aleena’s short-lived marriage.

This episode is the second of two episodes that explores an asexual marriage.

WARNING: this is an explicit episode with adult themes and language. Please put your earphones on and listen to this in private.

Tasneem:

For the sake of anonymity and to avoid unintended slander, no real names or locations have been mentioned. Our guest Aleenah’s name is also an alias. Please note, we’ve kept this conversation as authentic as possible.

 

Any comments directed at Aleena’s husband is not in reference to his sexuality; rather we are commenting on his behaviour as a husband.

 

This is not a discussion about the rights and wrongs of same sex attraction in Islam – rather it is focussed on the manipulative behaviour of someone we believe who has not come out of the closet, who wilfully misled his wife into marrying him only to then bodyshame her and make her feel inadequate, rather than owning his sexuality and being honest.

Nafisa:

Tasneem, you were a witness to the trial she had. Aleena is a childhood friend of yours and you were there for her from the beginning, albeit, even

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Ep 5. Part 1: Was my husband gay? (with Aleenah)

This episode is the first of two episodes that explores an asexual marriage. We hear sister Aleenah’s story, who recently got divorced as her husband refused to sleep with her. It led her to believe he was, in fact, gay. Aleenah’s story highlights the importance of how far we should actually compromise when we’re under pressure to marry.

 

WARNING: this is an explicit episode with adult themes and language. Please put your earphones on and listen to this in private.

 

Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed on these podcasts are those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Not Another Mum Pod’s management or of any sponsors. Any content provided by our contributors are of their opinion and are not intended to malign any religion, ethnic group, identity (gender or sexual) club, organization, company, individual or anyone or anything.

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The intention behind this candid conversation is to bring to light the serious issues that can happen in a marriage, that nobody openly talks about. The question to ask ourselves is, to what degree should our sisters compromise when getting married as well as during the marriage, and when do warning signs become too serious to ignore?

This episode is the first of two episodes that explores an asexual marriage.

WARNING: this is an explicit episode with adult themes and language. Please put your earphones on and listen to this in private.

Tasneem:

For the sake of anonymity and to avoid unintended slander, no real names or locations have been mentioned. Our guest Aleenah’s name is also an alias. Please note, we’ve kept this conversation as authentic as possible.

Aleena shares her heart-breaking story of how she got married in good faith only to be let down by her ex-husband, sexually and otherwise.

Nafisa:

It just goes to show, we really should do our due diligence as far as we can.

 

I know it’s not always possible, but at the very least, try not to ignore any signs that may be worrying. When you’re looking

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Ep 4.1. The masjid (mosque) and single mothers of boys – Bonus Track with Celina Hanif

Tune in to this bonus track to hear what Celina has to say about how some mosques (masjids) treat single mothers of boys and what impact this has on keeping children connected to their faith. For the full episode, listen to episode 4 where Celina shares her story about why she left Islam and how she found her way back again. 

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“Even if we, as mothers instilled a love for the mosque and our children, we can’t maintain that love beyond age seven. How as a community, can we then expect these same boys when they turn 17 or 18, that they should be in the masjid (mosque). I have not been able to take my children to the masjid as a single mother, since my eldest turned seven.”

Celina Hanif

This bonus tracks gives an extra point that Celina made about how the Muslim community can help foster the faith from an early age. 

Tasneem:

Celina, we’ve talked a lot about how a lack of acceptance from the Muslim community can push those already, struggling with their imaan (faith) even further away. We’ve also spoken about how a positive portrayal of our faith from an early age is integral to fostering a sense of love for Islam. And about how your relationship with the masjid helped bring you back to the deen (religion, i.e. Islam).

On that note, I wanted to ask you what can the masjid (mosque) do better to keep us and our children connected with our faith?

Celina:

The exclusion of boys being raised by single mothers, which happens a lot. Many mosques now have a policy of not allowing boys into the women’s section from as young as age seven, irrespective of whether or not they’ve reached puberty.

Now in the time of the prophet (SAW – peace be upon him), that wouldn’t be an issue because the way mosques were set up, they allowed children to be in the back rows of the men and the mothers could then join the front row from

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